Windows 11

I cannot fathom out, as to why MS constantly try to alienate themselves from their userbase?

Windows 11 is a mess of an OS, with absolutely no future ahead of itself, outlined most of all, by a Company which is not sure which direction to take the OS in.

Removing features that Windows was long known for, introducing features that no one wants, and ignoring feedback, despite forcing telemetry down everyone's neck, and not listening one jot to what it spells out to them?

They have lost all the 'grass roots', and progress, of what once made them makers of a great evolution, that was Windows.

I used to think, someone at MS has now lost the plot?, but as the years have rolled by, since Windows 10, I have come to the conclusion, that they have 'all' lost the plot.
 

garlin

Moderator
Staff member
I doubt if that's an "improvement", because Before allowed you to pick a Win32 app under "More apps". Which means you're really stuck using IFEO or SetUserFTA for a legacy app.
 

crypticus

Well-Known Member
I doubt if that's an "improvement", because Before allowed you to pick a Win32 app under "More apps". Which means you're really stuck using IFEO or SetUserFTA for a legacy app.

just once option is pretty good. we have look for another app on this PC

1659035004658.png
 
Drag & drop onto the 'Photoshop', or 'Notepad' icon if I wish?, for example ;) Basic things, without right/left clicking, double clicking, triple etc. on anything, nor going to little menu's at the bottom, to things that have been there for years?, and now hidden away :)

The problem with Windows is that it needs re-written, from the ground up, and there is no one around in that Company who is capable of doing so. So we get the 'regurge' nonsense, on top of the crap that is already there. We have had this since Windows 8, and unfortunately, still do at 11.

Dive down deep inside, and you will see the remnants of many Windows OS past, still showing face today, and I have no doubt, that they will still remain come Windows 12/13.

One can paint over the cracks, but eventually they will all show through ;)
 
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crypticus

Well-Known Member
Drag & drop onto the 'Photoshop', or 'Notepad' icon if I wish?, for example ;) Basic things, without right/left clicking, double clicking, triple etc. on anything, nor going to little menu's at the bottom, to things that have been there for years?, and now hidden away :)

The problem with Windows is that it needs re-written, from the ground up, and there is no one around in that Company who is capable of doing so. So we get the 'regurge' nonsense, on top of the crap that is already there. We have had this since Windows 8, and unfortunately, still do at 11.

Dive down deep inside, and you will see the remnants of many Windows OS past, still showing face today, and I have no doubt, that they will still remain come Windows 12/13.

One can paint over the cracks, but eventually they will all show through ;)

I can agree that they are not writing from ground up, but I don't think its all a bad thing. You shouldn't completely rewrite something that works for decades. They update and change and eventually they will get rid of all the old components. they can't just completely erase everything because so many companies and people still depend on old softwares because of old hardwares. these things take time. I bet the reason they are so willing to release new windows as 12-13-14 is to change things more rapidly and get rid of legacy softwares. there are too many variables they have to think of from competition to other os to supplying support or ending it.
 
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SM03

Active Member
can anyone confirm whether this option is available in NTL settings to customize START or not?
1.png
 
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Done several tests across the .431 .440 .450 builds, in VMWare, and have come to the conclusion that deleting/disabling anything on each, results in no performance gain whatsoever, and breaks system, unless one is careful, but updates, (unless you have this thing banished from the net?), will restore most of the hard work one has done to circumvent anything, although not all.

Funnily enough?, a gain was noticed in the system performance when all was left untouched??, albeit minor, WTF!!?? lol.

If you really must run this sh*t, then I recommend just installing as it is, bypassing the MS Account (if you so wish), then just uninstalling whatever afterwards. (Quite surprised how many it let me uninstall) Disable services etc., and turning off what you don't want running, and leave it be afterwards. This system breaks very easily, and at the slightest thing removed, and I suppose that is the way MS designed it to be?
 

Hellbovine

Active Member
Done several tests across the .431 .440 .450 builds, in VMWare, and have come to the conclusion that deleting/disabling anything on each, results in no performance gain whatsoever...
I just wanted to pop in and inquire about this. I don't actually know anything at all about VM, I've never used it myself because I find it to be just as easy to simply run things in a live environment for testing, which in my experience reading forums like these seems to have a lot of benefits over VM to do it "real". If something goes wrong it only takes me 5-10 minutes to reinstall Windows from a USB with all my tweaks on it already.

But the thing I wanted to mention which I can't articulate properly, maybe someone else can help me out, is that anything related to performance probably isn't going to show up in a VM situation. So what I mean is, in another thread we talked about how defaulting the registry to use the High Performance power plan can be integrated across all 4 parts of the Windows image (install, PE, setup, recovery) and it dramatically speeds up the installation process by a solid 50% because the balanced plan is normally the default and is substantially slower.

However, this performance increase does *not* show up in VM installs. I theorize this is because your VM is not actually running the power plan inside it, instead the container OS that is running the VM is what's responsible for the VM's performance. In other words, if I had Windows 7 running a VM of Windows 10, my Windows 7 power plan and its performance tweaks are what's dictating how fast or slow W10 will be.

I'm open to being told I'm wrong, like I said I don't use VM, but I've seen these kinds of comments sporadically in various forums, and I think people trying to do performance tweaks might be shooting themselves in the foot by trying to do any kind of benchmarking within a VM? Please let me know how it works if my understanding isn't correct, I'd like to learn.
 
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I do wish to stress, that my post is not just about 'performance', but rather about the time we now take, and care, to not allow this crap to consume us all? It was merely an info post to say that, despite all we may try, then I have (myself) come to the conclusion that 'its just is not worth the effort', to waste what little time we now have in this world, to fight against the unwinnable, aka, disabling this and that, or removing this from there.

Performance was probably the wrong word?, I agree. System responsiveness, is more likely correct. GPU and or Power Plans do not factor, as I was testing in VM, and all was base stock.
 
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Hellbovine

Active Member
...I have (myself) come to the conclusion that 'its just is not worth the effort', to waste what little time we now have in this world, to fight against the unwinnable.
Yeah I totally feel your pain. I just put in 20 hours total today and yesterday, and made no progress on my issue either. It sucks big time when things end up being out of your hands.
 
Yup. One ends up banging their head up against a brick wall constantly my friend, and for what? ;)

So, I'll install the sh*t, live with the sh*t, and that's it lmao.
 
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